Defense Taking Out Legs

Discussion in 'Ask the Ref' started by Vandala99, Oct 11, 2006.

  1. Vandala99

    Vandala99 New Member
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    In all our games so far, Defensive secondary players have intentionally taken out our Fullback's legs when he is lead blocking on an outside running play. Isn't this illegal? In one situation our Fullback' was called for the illegal block.

    In another situation our Offensive Tackle cut a Defensive End that is lined up just outside of him in a three point stance on the line of scrimmage. Out player was again called for an illegal block. What is defined as the blocking zone? My understanding is that the blocking zone is a yard on each side of the LOS and from Tackle to Tackle.
     
  2. FBRef

    FBRef Well-Known Member
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    The free blocking zone is 4 yards to either side of the ball and 3 yards into each team's backfield. The zone disintegrates when the ball leaves the zone.

    Only linemen, both offensive and defensive, on the LOS at the snap can block below the waist. They can only block oponents who are also legally able to block below the waist.

    Therefore, blocks below the waist by defensive backs or linebackers on pulling guards or blocking backs are illegal, just as a block by a fullback would be illegal.
     
  3. Cougarfan20

    Cougarfan20 Well-Known Member
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    This was called last year in the Super Bowl, if I remember correctly.

    As I remember it, Hasselbeck had thrown an interception downfield, and went to try to tackle the interceptor. In the process, the blocker in front of the interceptor fell down, replays showed that Hasselbeck hadn't hit him, but he was called for an illegal block and Seattle was penalized.
     
  4. FBRef

    FBRef Well-Known Member
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    As I recall, blocking below the waist in only illegal during a return in the NFL.
     
  5. Cougarfan20

    Cougarfan20 Well-Known Member
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    Here's how the official play by play states it: (From this site: http://www.superbowl.com/gamecenter/playbyplay/NFL_20060205_SEA@PIT)

    2-25-PIT34 (11:34) S.Alexander left end to PIT 27 for 7 yards (J.Porter).
    3-18-PIT27 (10:54) M.Hasselbeck pass intended for D.Jackson INTERCEPTED by I.Taylor at PIT 5. I.Taylor to PIT 29 for 24 yards (M.Hasselbeck).
    PENALTY on SEA-M.Hasselbeck, Low Block, 15 yards, enforced at PIT 29.

    Does a pass interception count as a return? Normally I think of a return as a kick or punt, but an interception is a change of possession, so I could see how it might also qualify.


    This post was edited on 10/12 6:29 AM by Cougarfan20if(GetAdminCookie() != 0) {document.write(' (Revisions[/URL])');}
    This post was edited on 10/12 6:30 AM by Cougarfan20if(GetAdminCookie() != 0) {document.write(' (Revisions[/URL])');}
     
  6. Vandala99

    Vandala99 New Member
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    Thanks Ref. Isn't 4 yards on either side of the ball kind of a judgment call? How do you make the call when there are no yard markers going from side to side?
     
  7. FBRef

    FBRef Well-Known Member
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    Anytime there's a change of possession during a down, it's classified as a return after the change. If you think about it, there's no other way to account statistically for the yardage gained. So when you see return yards in the stats, that's fumbles, interceptions, and kick returns.

    We make such judgments all the time. For example, the expanded neutral zone extends 2 yards down field. If a lineman is blocking his opponent, he may block him as much as two years downfield and not be called for ineiligible downfield on a pass. There are no marks on the field in many cases, so you make a judgment.

    That's another reason why I suggest lining the players up before the game, facing the sideline and let the officials see that the TE is in the FBZ.
     
  8. Cougarfan20

    Cougarfan20 Well-Known Member
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    Interesting point on returns after change of possesion. Those numbers should count somewhere, but they aren't ever mentioned in individual stats or as part of individual total offense stats.

    I'm gonna have to bring that up with the stats guys!
     
  9. FBRef

    FBRef Well-Known Member
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    The offense is the team that snaps the ball, so no, return yards are not included in total offense yards.

    And yes, return yards are recorded individually. Now, whether a particular school lists them or not is up to them.
     
  10. Cougarfan20

    Cougarfan20 Well-Known Member
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    I can't even find a college site that lists yards on interception returns as a statistic.

    Other returns get folded into all purpose yards, but interceptions fall out.
     

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